RUB » Faculty of Mathematics » Center of Computer Science » DNet | Distributed and Networked Systems 

Worst-Case Analysis of Distributed Systems


TL;DR This lecture will be about deterministic network calculus.

Distributed systems are omnipresent nowadays and networking them is fundamental for the continuous dissemination and thus availability of data. Provision of data in real- time is one of the most important non-functional aspects that safety-critical networks must guarantee. Formal verification of data communication against worst-case deadline requirements is key to certification of emerging x-by-wire systems. Verification allows aircraft to take off, cars to steer by wire, and safety-critical industrial facilities to oper- ate. Therefore, different methodologies for worst-case modeling and analysis of real-time systems have been established. Among them is deterministic Network Calculus (NC), a versatile technique that is applicable across multiple domains such as packet switching, task scheduling, system on chip, software-defined networking, data center networking and network virtualization. NC is a methodology to derive deterministic bounds on two crucial performance metrics of communication systems:
   (a) the end-to-end delay data flows experience and
   (b) the buffer space required by a server to queue all incoming data.

(Text source: [bib])

Organizational Details

Language of Instruction: English

Class hours (2 SWS):        Fridays, 10:15am to 11:45am in IA 1/181.
Exercise hours (2 SWS):   Fridays, 8:30am to 10:00am in IA 1/181.
Lecture period:                   April 17 to July 17, 2020.
  • The exercise classes will start on April 24.
  • Note the Pentecost vacation at RUB: there will be no classes on June 05.
Exam: Either written or oral, TBA in the first lecture.

Course credits: 5 CP

Literature:

  • Jean-Yves Le Boudec and Patrick Thiran. Network Calculus. Springer, 2001. (PDF @author)
  • Cheng-Shang Chang, Performance Guarantees in Communication Networks. Springer, 2000.
  • Jörg Liebeherr. Duality of the Max-Plus and Min-Plus Network Calculus. Foundation and Trends in Networking, 2017. (PDF @author)